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The Office is Dead ΓÇô Long Live the Office!

The Office is Dead ΓÇô Long Live the Office!

Office space experts gathered at the British Council for Offices (BCO) annual conference bashed their collective brains together as they discussed the role of the office in everyday working life.

Two opinions raised on the future of office space that were in stark contrast to one another where put forward by pattern recognition expert Magnus Lindkvist and journalist and commentator Jonathan Margolis, with Lindkvist stating that “people are abandoning the office, it’s a dying industry” and Margolis countering this by pointing out “it’s still important to physically meet with people, which is why the office is alive and kicking”.

Adding to the discussion, entitled How We Work and Why We Work, the speakers challenged one another on the core reasons for working, with renowned architect Roger Zogolovitch saying that “life is divided into internal time and external time, so while we don’t always need a physical capsule for working in, we also have a desperate need for a working landscape.”.

Margolis added to this by stressing that “while flexible working such as remote or home working is great, you also get an emotional connection in an office – for example if you see someone you grasp what they mean, not just hear what they want you to hear.”.

Lindkvist however rejected the notion of offices and the world of desk-bound work, challenging the industry to identify the meaning in work, saying that “work needs to be more than just about delivering a paycheck – there needs to be some meaning.” Zogolovitch responded by saying that workers must find their own meaning, urging office workers to “take control of our lives and the work we do, which in turn will help to give work meaning.”

We here at officebroker.com certainly value the role of a central office in helping to make us what we are and delivering the unique character of our organisation – How do you approach the role of the office in your day-to-day life? Is the ability to connect with your colleagues becoming less and less important as technology makes remote working easier? Or is the contact and communal interaction that come from a fixed office space irreplaceable?

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Author: | June 3, 2010 | 0 Comments

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