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Leeds Office Development Looks Up – Despite “loo brush” Trees

Leeds Office Development Looks Up – Despite “loo brush” Trees

Wellington Place in Leeds has been given the green light for a new office space development, located just off Wellington Street.

The proposal is for 110,000 sq ft of office space spread across a five-storey storey office property, which is situated next to the Grade II Listed ‘lifting tower’.

According to The Guardian, the council report claims that the new development will be a “successful backdrop to the listed lifting tower and will visually contain the northern side of the main square at the centre of the Wellington Place development.”

The report also mentions that the construction will result in a “high quality building” that “conforms to the objectives of the approved masterplan.”

As part of a separate project, Victoria Gardens in Leeds city centre is set to get a facelift following approval by city councillors.

Victoria Gardens will undergo development including replacing damaged paving, planting winter bulbs, and introducing new seating. The work is being funded by environment charity Groundwork in partnership with Marks and Spencer (M&S), which was launched in Leed’s Kirkgate Market over 125 years ago.

However, an interesting objection came in the form of criticism of the proposed type of trees.

The planned use of deciduous London Plane trees, which will be cropped and planted in a line along the Headrow, seemed to unsettle councillors, who felt that the square boxy style of cropping was inappropriate.

As reported by The Guardian, Conservative councillor Andrew Carter said:

“I have to say that in summer the new trees will look like loo brushes,” he commented. “They just look distinctly odd. Why can’t we just use normal trees?”

He claimed that it is an “architect’s dream”, adding: “It’s a good job I don’t believe in witches as they would be flying off with them in winter.”

However, other councillors such as Graham Latty, Neil Taggart and Colin Campbell approved the style, and the scheme achieved the go-ahead following five votes to three.

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Author: | September 17, 2010 | 0 Comments

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